Political Polls Worldwide

Collection of Political Polls Worldwide:

Turks Would Vote to Have a New Constitution

(Angus Reid Global Monitor) – Half of adults in Turkey are ready to endorse constitutional reform, according to a poll by MetroPOLL Strategic and Social Research Center. 50.6 per cent of respondents would back the changes in a referendum.

Turkish voters renewed the Great National Assembly in July 2007. Final results gave the Justice and Development Party (AKP) 46.6 per cent of the vote and 341 seats in the legislature. Parties require at least 10 per cent of the vote to earn seats under the country’s proportional representation system. Recep Tayyip Erdogan, a member of the AKP, has served as prime minister since March 2003.

Turkey’s current constitution was ratified in November 1982, and has been criticized for providing too much power to the Turkish Armed Forces through the National Security Council, an advisory body tasked with developing the “national security policy of the state.”

In March, the Turkish government presented 26 amendments to the constitution. The package seeks to expand the Constitutional Court from 11 to 19 members and modify the way these judges are appointed, establish new regulations to ban political parties, and guarantee specific preferential treatment for women, children, the elderly and the disabled.

Erdogan has defended his proposals, saying that the changes are needed for the country to come closer to European Union (EU) membership. The government requires the support of 367 lawmakers in the Great National Assembly to enact its reform package. If the proposal fails in the legislature—but is supported by 330 lawmakers—a nationwide referendum may be called.

On Apr. 18, Erdogan said the changes to the judiciary are especially necessary, adding, “We want to eradicate the imbalance between those who are elected and those who are appointed.”

Polling Data

Would you back constitutional changes if a referendum were held today?

Yes 50.6%
No 39.2%
Not sure 10.2%

Source: MetroPOLL Strategic and Social Research Center
Methodology: Interviews with 1,004 Turkish adults, conducted on Apr. 7 and Apr. 8, 2010. Margin of error is 3.1 per cent.

Sarkozy Gains Three Points in France

(Angus Reid Global Monitor) – Public support for Nicolas Sarkozy improved slightly in France, according to a poll by CSA published in Le Parisien. 37 per cent of respondents have confidence in their president to face the country’s problems, up three points since April.

In addition, 44 per cent of respondents have confidence in French prime minister François Fillon, up six points in a month.

In May 2007, Sarkozy, candidate for the centre-right Union for a Popular Movement (UMP) and former interior minister, won the presidential run-off with 53.06 per cent of the vote. Sarkozy appointed Fillon—who had been his adviser and presidential campaign leader—as prime minister.

Last month, Sarkozy discussed the global financial crisis, saying, “France’s belief is that it is totally unproductive to make accusations against one another. It is far more intelligent to prepare the necessary evolution of the monetary system in the 21st century.”

Polling Data

Do you have confidence in French president Nicolas Sarkozy to face the country’s problems?

May 2010 Apr. 2010 Mar. 2010
Confidence 37% 34% 36%
No confidence 58% 59% 58%

Do you have confidence in French prime minister François Fillon to face the country’s problems?

May 2010 Apr. 2010 Mar. 2010
Confidence 44% 38% 42%
No confidence 51% 55% 51%

Source: CSA / Le Parisien
Methodology: Telephone in

Socialists Have Ten-Point Lead in Portugal

(Angus Reid Global Monitor) – The governing Socialist Party (PS) now has a larger advantage over the opposition Social Democratic Party (PSD) in Portugal, according to a poll by Marktest released by Diario de Noticiasand TSF. 35.6 per cent of respondents would back the PS in the next election, while 25.4 per cent would support the PSD.

Socialists Have Ten-Point Lead in Portugal

Problems Continue for Free Democrats in Germany

(Angus Reid Global Monitor) – The junior coalition partner in Germany has dropped to single digits, according to a poll by FG Wahlen released by ZDF. 38 per cent of respondents would vote for the pro-business Free Democratic Party (FDP) in the next federal election, down two points since mid-March.

Problems Continue for Free Democrats in Germany